The next prime minister…..

The last couple of days my newsfeed has been full of people celebrating the fact that Michael Gove is out of the running for Prime Minister. The majority of those people are teachers and I guess it is understandable that they feel that way. Gove was a very divisive Education Secretary; he spent a lot of his time setting schools and teachers up in competition against each other while the majority of us like to work together in collaboration with one another. He also referred to many of us as “Enemies of Promise”, “The blob” and many other insulting things. This has led to many people despising him and everything he says or does. I take a different approach – I’m certainly not a fan of his and I very much despise some of his policies, but there are others that I approve of. You can read my review of his tenure as Ed Sec here.

That said, two weeks ago the idea of Gove leading this country would have appalled and disgusted me. Today the news that he won’t be leading it has thrown me into a pit of despair. Not because I have any real faith in his ability to create a fairer, more equal society, or a strong economy or anything else, but because he was by far the least worst option.

Now we face the certainty that our next Prime Minister will be either Theresa May or Andrea Leadsom, and that terrifies me.

Theresa May has spent her tenure at the home office espousing her feeling that we should withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights. She has repeatedly lied about issues regarding it and her recent U turn on the topic reeks of an attempt to detoxify her brand. She also voted to repeal the Human Rights Act and voted against making it illegal to discriminate on the basis of caste. Andrea Leadsom’s voting record on these issue is almost identical as are Gove’s.

May has repeatedly voted against equal rights for homosexuals, voting against repealing section 28, voting against allowing homosexual couples to adopt and voting against allowing gay couples to use artificial insemination to conceive. She did manage to vote for equal marriage rights, but given her voting record on other acts of equality it would not be a big jump to assume that this was more down to following the government line as home secretary than being in favour of it.
Leadsom has been absent, or abstained, on all votes pertaining to equal rights, citing that she is against such things as Equal Marriage because she feels that it “hurts Christians” – something that I take exception to. Marriage in this country legal enshrines those involved into a relationship and bestows upon those involved certain legal rights, and no one should be excluded from that. Her argument seems to be that marriage “belongs” to Christians, however the idea of marriage actually pre-dates Christianity – a fact that clearly shows her ideas are nonsensical. Gove on the other hand was consistent in his votes for gay rights, voting for them at every vote he was present for.

All three candidates voted to cut benefits repeatedly, across all sectors. They all voted for lower taxes for the very rich (over £150,000 salary) but for raising regressive taxes =such as VAT and Fuel tax which hit the poorer sections of society much harder than the rich. The all voted together on the rest of the main policies, such as privatising Royal Mail, privatising the health and education services, restricting legal aid etc. I guess you would expect all this as it is a main part of tory ideology! Interestingly Gove and May voted for and against EU integration where Leadsom – “star of the leave campaign” always voted for increasing EU integration. Disappointingly, but not surprisingly, none of them supports assisted dying for the terminally ill.

What’s clear is that we are going to have a new prime minister, that prime minister will be a tory and will be a tory who sits considerably further to the right than David Cameron. Cameron moved his part from the realms of Thatcherism towards the “One nation Conservativism” that Disraeli had been fond of. Signs suggest that Gove has an egalitarian side and may have kept this up. May and Leadsom, however, do not. Whichever one wins we will see a lurch back to the right, to Thatcherism.
I think there is a horrible irony that when our new prime minister is in place she will be the second female prime minister, but she will also be the prime minister who is most against equality since Thatcher. The progress this country has made towards equality since 1997 will stop. I just hope that we don’t move backwards.

Sources:

Voting records from – http://www.theyworkforyou.com

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Labour Leadership

I’ve just watched the Sunday Politics Labour Leadership debate, it’s good to see a platform for these hustings that everyone can access. I thought the debate was conducted in good spirit from most of the candidates although I wish it had been someone other than Andrew Neil in the Chair.

Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn kept up his consistent anti – austerity message, favouring a growing economy over a shrinking state as the best means to decrease the defecit. He is clearly a contender who holds true Labour values of equality,  fairness and democracy and as leader would certainly take the party back to its roots. I thought he looked confident, knew his stuff and was unphased by Neil’s constant badgering. I particularly liked his answer to the question “would you have any of your leadership opponents in the shadow cabinet?” Which was to suggest all ministerial roles be decided democratically. He spoke of a need to add in more bands on housing to raise fair taxes. He spoke of a need to build more council houses and therefore bring down the housing benefit bill and he spoke of a need to tackle tax avoidance and evasion which costs the economy billions.

Liz Kendal

At the other end of the spectrum we had Liz Kendal, she’s a self proclaimed “Blairite” and is certainly trying to paint herself as a modern day Tony Blair. I think there is a difference though. Blair built a growing economy, he appealed to the middle class then handed the money to a true socialist in the exchequer who spent it on improving education, health, infrastructure and creating a greater Britain for all. Kendal sounds more like Cameron, with her repeated insistence that the party needs to adopt the policies of the Tories and to appeal to their voters, as well as questioning her opponents on how they would fund not cutting services that haven’t yet been cut,  I was left thinking “but they’re being paid for at the moment”.

Andy Burnham

Burnham spoke extremely well on a number of issues, he certainly seems to be in near constant agreement with Corbyn and looks like he wants to reconnect with traditional Labour values. He’s prepared to accept he has made mistakes and genuinely seems to want a better future for all. He, with Corbyn and Cooper, spoke vehemently against the cutting of child benefit and tax credits for third (and later) children but then stated he was “in favour of the principle of the benefits cap”. This seemed not to fit with some of his other views and I was left wondering if on some issues he was playing lip service to policies he thought were necessary to win the leadership of the party, then the country.

Yvette Cooper

Yvette spoke of the need to celebrate all that Labour achieved while in government. She holds true centre left values and wants to improve the country for all concerned. She expressed deep worries over the recent budget and how it will hit hard working families the hardest. She spoke of her pride in the diversity of the nation and linked this to her own heritage.

There was consensus between Burnham, Cooper and Corbyn on a number of issues, although the latter was the only one consistent in an anti – austerity message. It was good to see the debate and I hope to see more in the contest, to enable all Labour members and supporters to make the most informed choice.

We all need Feminism

I have just seen one of the most vile memes I have ever come across. The title is “I need Feminism like a godammned hole in the head” and it contains a number of pictures of a woman holding slogans such as
“I need Feminism because I too stupid to think for myself” and “I need Feminism because protests make me feel important.” To top it off the person sharing it had included the caption “This chick gets it.”

I find it incredulous that anyone could think Feminism was anything other than a good thing. The very definition of Feminism is a desire for equality between the sexes. The desire to see men and women treated equally, hold equal station in life, in relationships, in work. To be paid the same and given the same benefits.

Feminism brought us out of the dark ages, people fought, and died, to give women the vote. People gave up a lot to grant women equal pay. A fight led by trade unions that is actually still going on to this day.

I’m at a loss to see how anyone can see equality as a bad thing, and as such I’m at a loss to see how anyone can see Feminism as a bad thing.

We still haven’t achieved an equal society, that saddens me and shows me that Feminism is still an extremely important, and necessary,  movement. I’m proud to call myself a feminist.